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Mass Torts | Talcum Powder

Stein Law is reviewing cases on behalf of women who developed ovarian cancer or mesothelioma after using talc powder or other talc products.

About the Talcom Powder Lawsuit

Since 1971, more than 20 studies have linked talcum (talc) powder to ovarian cancer, and, in 2003, an analysis of 16 of these studies found that ** women using talcum powder were 33 percent more likely to develop ovarian cancer.** It has been alleged that Johnson & Johnson, the maker of popular talc-based products, knew about the risk of ovarian cancer since at least 1982, but failed to warn women using these products.

In addition, recently unearthed information reported by The New York Times showed that Johnson & Johnson knew of the possible link of asbestos to their talc products. According to the article, the company spent decades trying to keep this negative information from reaching the public

Does Talcum Powder Cause Cancer?

For decades, researchers have been studying the potential link between ovarian cancer and talcum powder. It is believed that talc powder, when used near the genitals, can travel to the ovaries and become embedded in ovarian tissue. While talc is a natural mineral, it is very difficult for the body to remove the particles, and, as a result, inflammation may occur and cancerous tumors may form.

The first study to suggest that talc may cause ovarian cancer was published in 1971 in the medical journal The Lancet. In the study, researchers discovered that a majority of ovarian tumors had talc particles “deeply embedded” in them. Then, in 1982, researchers found that women using talcum powder during ovulation were at a 92 percent increased risk of developing ovarian cancer. During the next three decades, an additional 21 studies were performed on talc powder, and almost all of these studies found that women using these products near their genitals were at an increased risk for developing ovarian cancer.

To date, both the National Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society consider talc use near the genitals as a “risk factor” for ovarian cancer. Despite this possible link, Johnson & Johnson and other talc powder manufacturers have not placed warnings about this risk on their products.

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